Homesteading with Hyacynth: Eat Local, LLC!

Welcome to Homesteading with Hyacynth!

Homesteading with Hyacynth is a monthly look at ways to lead a healthy, greener, more sustainable life. My intent with Homesteading with Hyacynth is to offer genuine, practical experiences and humorous and helpful tips. Of course, I am not a medical professional so these are my tips and what worked for my family.eat local

With summer now in full swing, it’s time to eat local, Little Lake County!

But why, when there’s a perfectly good grocery store waiting for us, should we even bother? Well, let us count the ways! Eight of them that would make great grandma proud, I’m sure!

eat local
cherry tomatoes

1. Fresh, local food tastes better.
When I was a kid, I thought veggies were the worst! And it’s because they were. It wasn’t until I was an adult that I realized canned peas and canned carrots don’t hold a candle to fresh ones!

Do a side-by-side taste test as a family activity and see for yourself the difference between canned green beans and freshly steamed green beans. No mush, no gush — just lots of fresh flavor and a slight crunch.

2. When you buy local, you support small businesses and family farms.

Buying local means more of your money stay local, thus supporting our local economy and our local farmers and growers. Our local farmers can earn fair wages when we buy locally.

3. You’ll come to understand what’s in season when.

Eating locally and seasonally connects us with our land and the seasons, giving us a greater understanding of the importance of caring for our land!

4. Know your roots {and vines and branches and ….}

Your kids will know where your food actually comes from — and it’s not the grocery store fairy!

eat local
broccoli!

5. Local, fresh food is more nutrient-dense.

Food picked fresh from the field and delivered straight to your farmer’s market or Community Supported Agriculture box actually is more nutrient dense than the food that’s traveled across country to the grocery store shelves. The more days food remains off the vine, stem or tree, the more nutrient loss it suffers, which produces food that is the same calorie wise but greatly different nutrient wise. Buying local gives you more bang for your nutritional buck!

6. Local food preserves local open spaces!

More local open spaces often leads to increased air quality, beauty and environmental health, supporting important pollinators like butterflies and honey bees! Local food cuts down on shipping pollution and packaging waste, too.

7. Buying local food from local farmers gives you a voice!

You can ask your farmer if he uses natural farming methods, and you can kindly express your appreciation to the farmer who adheres to growing practices you appreciate by giving him your dollar, your support and your gratitude. Or you can kindly decline buying produce that doesn’t meet your standard and explain your reason to someone who actually cares.

8. Buying local food is safe!

Big ag practices increase the chances of food-borne illnesses. Local food typically is grown and harvested on a smaller scale and without the use of packaging plants, which decreases the likelihood of contamination.

eat localSo are you ready to Eat Local, LLC?

Take the #EatLocalLLC challenge! Post your pictures of your local food finds on our Facebook page, Instagram or Twitter and use the #EatLocalLLC hashtag! 

Every week on Facebook we’ll be asking you to show us your bounty and featuring some of the best bounties and local food finds around.

Join in and perhaps something awesome might happen by mid season! 

 

Tips:

  • While most CSA sign ups have passed, you can still eat local by attending an array of local farmers markets! My favorites in Lake County? Grayslake and Libertyville.
  • Lake County also has a number of roadside markets and stands. My notable favorites? Temple Hill Farms in Wadsworth and Our Farm in Volo.
Dance academy of Libertyville
About Hyacynth 33 Articles
Hyacynth Worth is wife to John and mother to two boys and two girls. She writes about motherhood, healthy living and faith at Undercover Mother. She is Little Lake County's managing editor and the author of Homesteading with Hyacynth. She promises to be candid, amusing and only slightly neurotic. Most of the time.

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